Now on Fishduck.com: “Three Shortcuts to Creating a No-Huddle Offense”

Check out my latest post for FishDuck.com, talking about a few simple steps you can take to create a no-huddle offense without a complicated communication system:

“Finally, if you want to go extremely high-speed on offense, you can practice 1-2 sequences that can last anywhere from 4-8 plays. Like everything else we’ve talked about, you can either have your players memorize the sequences or put the plays on a wristband for them to wear.

“An effective use of this method speeds up your offense in two ways. First, your players already know what the next play is, so you’re not using time in between snaps to get the call in. Second, your guys will play faster the more acclimated they are to the speed and the sequence of plays.

“This is something that Chip Kelly practiced at Oregon and took with him when he left for Philadelphia. A close examination of several Eagles games from this past season reveals many instances where Nick Foles and the offense ran certain plays during the opening series of the game, and then they came back and ran the exact same plays in the exact order during the next series.”

You can read the whole thing here.


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Four Variations on the ‘Stick’ Concept

Though originally introduced to football through the Bill Walsh/ Paul Brown inspired West Coast Offense, the Stick concept has proliferated to all levels of football, and you’ll find that most teams run some form of it in today’s game.

The stick route’s staying power for so long is due in large to it’s adaptability to so many offenses. It’s good against man, zone, and the subsequent constraint plays the you can run because of it should give you a simple but effective package that will provide you with a lot of answers to what the defense tries to throw at you. No matter what you’re running as your base scheme, chances are you can find room in your playbook » Read more

Chip Kelly Clinic Notes

This is an old but great transcript of Chip Kelly talking about the zone read when he was at Oregon.

Note that Kelly does not get all up in arms over teaching the offensive line the type of front they’re facing, whether it’s over or under, etc.

As long as the linemen can count, they do not need to know whether it is an over or under front- our rules will take care of that.”

» Read more

Baltimore Ravens Unbalanced Run Game

With the beginning of pre-sales here on the site for my upcoming book Speed Kills: Breaking Down the Chip Kelly OffenseI’ve been offering the Ravens offensive line manual as an incentive for buying multiple copies of the book.

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However, there are plenty of other great resources from Jon Harbaugh’s team that I can share with you, and one of my favorites is the information on the unbalanced line run game that Baltimore has made a living off of for several seasons.

» Read more

Inside Gus Malzahn’s Playbook

Up until this point, there was not much you could do to get any inside information on how he thinks and what his terminology is, short of either buying his book (which is excellent) or going down to visit him at Auburn (in which case you’d better get in line).

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However, I’ve got the next best thing. Thanks to some film trading friends of mine, I’ve got some great stuff from when Malzahn was at Tulsa. The head coach at Auburn has evolved a bit since those days, mostly to fit the personnel he has, but the core principles remain the same. So, here are some great installation materials from Gus Malzahn’s time as a part of the Golden Hurricane football program.

 

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Hiding in plain sight: Denver’s “Delay-Follow” Boot Concept

I just want everyone to know that this post has absolutely nothing to do with a certain Seahawks defender who had a very memorable postgame interview with Erin Andrews last night, but I need page views, so if you’ll excuse me, I have to boost this site’s SEO visibility:

RICHARD SHERMAN RICHARD SHERMAN RICHARD SHERMAN RICHARD SHERMAN RICHARD SHERMAN.

Sorry about that. Anyway, Peyton Manning had by far his best day against a Bill Belichick defense in the postseason, posting a 118.4 passer rating against a defense that struggled all day long against the veteran quarterback.

One of the plays that caught my eye was Manning’s first touchdown pass of the game, a one yard throw and catch to TE Jacob Tamme, a former team mate of Manning’s in Indy as well. Even in a simple naked bootleg on the goal line, there is often a lot detail and deception hidden. » Read more

OMAHA! Peyton Manning, John Heisman, and the origin of Pre-Snap Verbiage

Football is a unique game, which is why we love it. One of the biggest differences between football and other sports is that there’s only one game a week. As a result, reporters, journalists, and whatever the hell Skip Bayless and Stephen A. Smith are calling themselves these days all need things to talk about, write about, and discuss.

Pictured: "Journalism"

Pictured: “Journalism”

Believe it or not, sometimes there are actually a few interesting stories that come out of all that journalistic digging. One of the side stories that has taken social media by storm is Peyton Manning’s use of the word Omaha while making his checks and audibles at the line of scrimmage.

Companies are hopping on the bandwagon, offering travel deals to the city of Omaha, Nebraska. There is even a collection of Omaha businesses who have pledged $500 to Peyton Manning’s foundation for every time he uses the word in today’s game.

What does Omaha mean? Is it a run play, pass play, or a play action pass? Ask Peyton himself, he’ll tell you: » Read more

Gus Malzahn’s Zone Read Load Scheme

Monday night’s BCS National Championship Game had all kinds of highlights, both offensively and defensively, but ask anyone who knows football, and they’ll tell you some of the most interesting things happen on plays that aren’t necessarily defined as explosive or memorable.Football people find just as much satisfaction in watching a well-executed kick out block or an interesting option play that goes for five yards as they do by watching an 80-yard bomb. What makes Gus Malzahn’s offense so successful is his obsessive attention to detail, investigating every contingency, every formation against every available defense, and trying to discover an alignment that gives his guys the best angle on the defense, whether it’s to run inside, outside, or gain leverage on a secondary to spring an athletic receiver wide open over the middle (as he managed to do successfully again, and again, and again on Monday).

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During the hours leading up to kickoff between Auburn and Florida State, I posted some cutups of Auburn’s run game under Malzahn in 2010 with Heisman winner Cam Newton. The head coach of the Tigers is constantly in the lab tinkering with formations and blocking assignments, and Monday night did not disappoint. » Read more

Bill Parcells on the 11 Quarterback Commandments

Bill Parcells has long been recognized as a football rehabilitation expert of sorts, bringing the Giants, Patriots, Jets, and then Cowboys back to playoff respectability, including winning two Super Bowls during his time as the Giants head coach. It’s not surprising then, that he picked up a few grains of knowledge along the way.

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After leaving the Cowboys, Parcells did what every coach with an adversarial relationship with the media does upon retirement: he got a plush job as an analyst for ESPN. In one of his more memorable segments, Parcells outlined 11 things he told his quarterbacks to focus on, or what he calls his “Quarterback Commandments.”

Check out the list with a paraphrased list of what he has to say.

(You can see the video after the jump). » Read more

Wrecking Ball: Breaking down Eric Decker’s Four TD Performance against the Chiefs

This just in: The Denver Broncos are pretty good.

On the first chilly December afternoon of 2013, millions of television viewers saw Eric Decker score 4 touchdowns against a Kansas City defense that early in the year had been one of the league’s best. With the future Hall-of-Famer Peyton Manning under center, this has become normal to see on the Denver stat sheet.

(Getty Images)

Once again, just as in Indianapolis, Manning has three excellent receivers to choose from. With Demaryius Thomas and Eric Decker playing outside, and Wes Welker lining up in the slot, it’s not hard to see why this Bronco offense has already broken several long-standing franchise records. Any of the skill position players on this offense are good enough to have the kind of day that Decker had against the Chiefs, today just happened to be his day.

Let’s find out why, by breaking down all four of his touchdowns, and look at why Manning decided to call his number so many times. » Read more

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